Clinical Studies

Clinical studies related to the TrachFlush "Flush Controller"

Appropriate ventilator settings for the TrachFlush automated tracheal secretion removal - preliminary results by DS Karbing, N Dey, CG Sølling, AH Nielsen, SE Rees, and R Winding - read the abstract here

Summary of the study: The TrachFlush technology effectively remove secretion, and prevented the need for endotracheal suctioning in 7/8 patients

Listen to the abstract below:

TrachFlush clinical trial preliminary results voiceoverby Stephen E. Rees
00:00 / 02:50

An Artificial Cough Maneuver to Remove Secretion from Below the Endotracheal Tube Cuff by A. Zanella, G. Florio, E. Rezoagli, M. Pastore, P. Cadringer, O. Biancolilli, E. Carlesso, V. Scaravilli, G. Ristagno, and A. Pesenti - read the abstract here

Summary of the study: The TrachFlush technology was evaluated in an in-vitro setup, and it was found that the technology could effectively deflate and inflate the cuff during prolonged inspiratory time, effectively remove secretion, and maintain the cuff pressure.

The Rapid-Flow Expulsion Maneuver in Subglottic Secretion Clearance to Prevent Ventilator-Asscoaited Pneumonia: A Randomized Controlled Study by Y. Lo, X. Yuan, B. Sun, H. Li, H. Chu, L. Wang, Y. Zhao, X. Tang, R. Wang, X. Li, Z. Tong, and C Wang - read the abstract here

Summary of the study: The Rapid-Flow Expulsion Maneuver (a manual TrachFlush maneuver) was compared with standard subglottic secretion (SDD) for preventing VAP. A study on 241 patients investigating what method was better at clearing subglottic secretions and preventing VAP. The RFEM maneuver was safe to use without severe complications, but the study found no significant difference in the incidence of VAP between RFEM and SSD, and the RFEM may be an alternative method for clearing subglottic secretions.

The Evaluation of the Safety and Effectiveness of the Rapid Flow Expulsion Maneuver to Clear Subglottic Secretions In Vitro and In Vivo by J. Li, Y. Zong, Q. Zhou, H. Dao, and C. Wang - read the abstract here

Summary of the study: The Rapid-Flow Expulsion Maneuver is a method of compressing a resuscitation bag while performing a rapid deflation and inflation of the cuff. The maneuver has been used since the 1990s in Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, and proved in this study to be safe and effective in removing subglottic secretions In Vitro and In Vivo.

Clinical studies related to the TrachFlush "Cuff Controller"

Continuous endotracheal tube cuff pressure control system protects against ventilator-associated pneumonia by Leonardo Lorente, María Lecuona, Alejandro Jiménez, Lisset Lorenzo, Isabel Roca, Judith Cabrera, Clina Llanos, and Mariá L Mora - read the abstract here

Summary of the study: The use of a of a continuous endotracheal cuff pressure control system and/or an endotracheal tube with a lumen for subglottic secretion drainage could help to prevent VAP by approx. 50% in patients requiring more than 48 hours of mechanical ventilation.

Endotracheal tube cuff pressure changes during manual cuff pressure control manouvres: An in-vitro 35 aassessment by N. Aeppli, B. Lundauer, M. Steurer, M. Weiss, and A. Dullenkopf - read the abstract here

Summary of the study: Pages 55-60 it was found that routine manual cuff pressure control result in considerable cuff pressure drops. This might lead to silent aspiration.

Continuous control of tracheal cuff pressure and microaspiration of gastric contents in critically ill patients by S. Nseri, F. Zerimech, C. Fournier, R. Lubret, P. Ramon, A. Durocher, and M. Balduyck - read the abstract here

Summary of the study: Pages 1041-1047 it was found that continuous control of cuff pressure is associated with significantly decreased microaspiration of gastric contents and reduced the incidence of VAP in critically ill patients. According to the authors, implementation of continuous cuff control should be considered in ICUs with VAP rates.

Is continuous better than intermittent control of tracheal cuff pressure? A meta-analysis by Z. Wen, L. Wei, J. Chen, A. Xie, M. Li, and L. Bian - read the abstract here

Summary of the study: Pages 76-82 it was found that continuous control of cuff pressure offers more benefits in stabilizing the cuff pressure and reducing the incidence of VAP.